2018 Trip Checklist

  • West Coast Trail
  • Padre
  • Longs. Mt. Lady Washington, Storm
  • Mt. Taylor
  • Blanca and Ellingwood, Lindsey
  • Challenger, Kit Carson, Humbolt
  • Culebra
  • Challenger, Kit Carson, Columbia Point, Obstruction, Humbolt
  • Mosquito Gulch (Loveland, Buckskin, Tweto, Treasurevault, Mosquito, Kuss, London)
  • Alphabetizer Loop Lost Creek Wilderness (12.2 miles 4000 feet) X and Y prime, Y and Z and zyphyr
  • Antero
  • Mt. Holy Cross
  • Sunshine, Handies, Redcloud, Sun Dog (Silver Creek camp)
  • East and West Spanish Peaks
  • Massive
  • Santa Fe, Morgan, Sullivan, Geneva, Landslide
  • Square Top, Decatur Revenue, Silver (this might be combined with trip above if we camp)
  • Lower Gunnison Paddleboarding 3-day trip (https://rootsrated.com/stories/canoeing-colorado-s-lower-gunnison-river-the-perfect-beginner-trip-on)
  • CT Segment 8
  • Fremont10- Hayden Pass to North Decker Creek Traverse (https://www.summitpost.org/hayden-pass-to-north-decker-creek-traverse/723624)

Mosquito Gulch Trip

I was playing around with Caltopo during lunch one day at work, and stumbled across the Mosquito Gulch cirque section shown below:

which, at  10.69 miles and 5000 vertical ascent, offers 7 13ers:

  • Loveland
  • Buckskin
  • Tweto
  • Treasurevault
  • Mosquito
  • Kuss
  • London

There are a half dozen or more trip reports out there (like this one https://www.14ers.com/php14ers/tripreport.php?trip=8533). Definitely going to have to throw this into the summer mix.

Quandary Peak Winter Climb Lessons

A buddy and I decided to go after Quandary Peak shortly before the years end after a third party backed out (rightfully) of our initial Mt. Lady Washington plans. The weather forecast called for clear, unseasonably warm (at that altitude) temperature with a moderate 35 MPH breeze at the summit. With 100 MPH winds all across the area, they were a little off on their wind estimates.

  • https://www.facebook.com/feldman81/videos/10215022322049403/
  • http://kdvr.com/2017/12/30/wind-gusts-to-nearly-100-mph-force-breckenridge-resort-to-close/

Below is a video I took in a somewhat sheltered area right above treeline after we decided to retreat at about 13,100 Ft

The lessons learned:

  1. Snow is hard, even easier 14ers are hard, so still need to start early and hydrate, get calories. The wind played a huge factor in our ascent speed, but we were ascending at 1/3 -1/4 my summer ascent speed
  2. Wind is hard, and head-wind is even harder (especially above 60 MPH) … see above
  3. Snowshoes are easier than post-holing, even if you only post-hole every 50th step or so
  4. Attach gloves and other stuff that can fly away to something
  5. Don’t leave god-damned insoles at the house (had to use an extra pair of socks that Matt brought, which severally effed my toe coming down)
  6. Spike covers are good, and in the case of quandary, snow axe not even remotely necessary, not many opportunities for glissade (could change in Spring)
  7. Figure out the damn balaclava situation, couldn’t breath with it on, glasses fogged, nose and lips shitty with it off (see 7 follow up below)
  8. Figure out where to pack everything … I am very experienced with summer backpacking/hiking, but I spent about 20 minutes shuffling shit around this trip (see 8 follow up below)
  9. I left my dam anemometer at home. I knew I wanted to bring it, and now I am pissed that I do not have an actual reading of the wind speeds we dealt with, just a rough estimate of 70-85 MPH on a couple of the stronger gusts
  10. Start early, even when you do not think you need to start early. Others summited simply because the started earlier and the wind really picked up beginning around 1 PM.
  11. Caltopo is awesome … no seriously these guys rule. Their free service provides grade slope angle shading on maps, and just about every other feature/layer you could want (www.caltopo.com)

7 – Follow up.

I was fighting my balaclava/google/hat situation the entire length of the hike. All was well when it was cold and we were stationary, but it was difficult to breath during some of the more strenous portions since the balaclava didn’t have any vents. My shitty moto googles fogged up regularly, and my nose was cold an miserable without a balaclava. I shopped around a little and decided to give these two items a go:

  • https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0175TMTOS/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o09_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
  • https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0018BJSQC/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o06_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I wore everything around the house marching up and down the stairs and this …

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

is decidedly better than …

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

even though I look like a B movie villian

8 – Follow up.

I spent an hour playing around with my pack earlier this week and I was able to find a good (enough) setup for everything. My snowshoes are clipped to the side of the bag, avalanche prob is right inside the main compartment, ice axe is affixed to one of the loops on the front of the bag, and the snow shovel is clipped to the front of the bag, and its handle in the front slot.  It is still a PITA to get some of the deeper items out of the main compartment. Eventually I will find a better winter bag.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here comes the heat

Quoting a report from motherboard …

Think of the stickiest, record-hot summer you’ve ever experienced, whether you’re 30 or 60 years old. In 10 years or less, that miserable summer will happen every second year across most of the U.S. and Canada, the Mediterranean, and much of Asia, according to a study to be published in the open access journal Earth’s Future. By the 2030s, every second summer over almost all of the entire Northern hemisphere will be hotter than any record-setting hot summer of the past 40 years, the study found. By 2050, virtually every summer will be hotter than anything we’ve experienced to date. Record hot summers are now 70 times more likely than they were in the past 40 years over the entire Northern hemisphere, the peer-reviewed study found. What does all this mean? Heat alerts will be increasing, cities will have to employ aggressive cooling strategies most summers, and in places like South Asia, it will be too dangerous to work outside, Francis Zwiers, director of the Pacific Climate Impacts Consortium at Canada’s University of Victoria, said.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017EF000639/abstract

Latest Pike’s Peak Time Lapse


Pikes Peak Northeast Time-Lapse Over 3 Storms

Pikes Peak East Time-Lapse Over 3 Storms

Alice is cleaning up


 

Horsethief Trail Snowshoeing with Logan


https://goo.gl/photos/sRF5cg34HbLQ5fgV6

Colorado Springs Windstorm

Holy hell we got hammered by Chinook winds (see Chinook tidbits below) over the last three days:

  • Monday 1.9.17 – Weather station registered a gust of 77 MPH, and sustained winds of 50 mph
  • Tuesday 1.10.17 – Gust of 74, sustained of 45 mph
  • Wednesday 1.11.17 – Gust of 66, sustained of 30 mph

Trees were down all over town, semis flipped on their sides all along the highway, roofs ripped off, fences down (update 1.23.17 Home Depot and Lowes are still out of lumber), power lines down, houses and cars crushed by trees. Fort Carson and Cheyenne mountain were forced to shelter in place due to ludicrous 100 MPH winds. The official wind gusts from NWS (including record setting gusts … three of them … over 80 MPH at Colorado Springs Airport).

Cool videos:

 

Chinook wind craziness:

  • Loma, Montana, boasts having the most extreme recorded temperature change in a 24-hour period. On January 15, 1972, the temperature rose from -54 to 49 °F (-48 to 9 °C), a 103 °F (58 °C) change in temperature, a dramatic example of the regional Chinook wind in action.
  • The Black Hills of South Dakota are home to the world’s fastest recorded rise in temperature. On January 22, 1943, at about 7:30 am MST, the temperature in Spearfish, South Dakota, was -4 °F (-20 °C). The chinook kicked in, and two minutes later, the temperature was 45 °F (7 °C). The 49 °F (27 °C) rise set a world record, yet to be exceeded. By 9:00 am, the temperature had risen to 54 °F (12 °C). Suddenly, the Chinook died down and the temperature tumbled back to -4 °F (-20 °C). The 58 °F (32 °C) drop took only 27 minutes.
  • The aforementioned 107 mph (172 km/h) wind in Alberta and other local wind records west of the 100th meridian on the Great Plains of the United States and Canada, as well as instances of the record high and low temperature for a given day of the year being set on the same date, are largely the result of these winds.



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