Outside Magazine is a shit show

It took hours with of calls and emails to find out why I was not receiving the subscription that was gifted to me for Christmas. There was no confirmation number sent, though my mother was charged. The people I spoke to on the phone had no idea who either of us was. On the third or fourth call I got a hold of someone sympathetic, who simply created a subscription for me on the phone.  She told me their computer system/website was a bit of a mess, and that these things had been happening too often.

Fast-forward to a couple of weeks ago, when I received a flyer (image below) in the mail urging me to resubscribe by 4.27.16 to lock in a low rate. That in itself was pretty damn funny seeing that it was mailed 7.9.18. On top of that my subscription does not expire until next spring so for the life of me, I do not know why this would have been mailed to me. I love their magazine/content, but I get the feeling that the Santa Fe office is hitting the sauce a little too much during work hours.

Parenting log 180730

  • Me – “Well summer is almost over, and it’s kind of depressing how little you have been outside. It was 72 degrees today, fall weather … did you get off your computer and do anything outside?”
  • Kid #1 – “No, 72 is hot … I prefer like 60 degrees.”

In your wildest dreams

How hard is your state?

Growing up in Lake Wobegon, Texas, I was often told we had the most severe weather in the country. I’ve since lived in Illinois, California, Maine, Kansas, and now Colorado and I’ve been pretty impressed with the severity of the weather here. Today my kids and I were discussing the variability of our weather and we began wondering which states would have the most drastic differences between record high and low temperatures. It turns out Montana-ites? are the hardest of the hard, with a ridiculous 187° F difference between record high and low temps. Colorado comes in at a respectable 9th, with Texas coming in at 40th. Now I wonder how our states would stack up against small countries across the world.

RankStateRecord high (F)DateRecord low (F)DateDiff
1Montana11707.05.1937-7001.20.1954187
2Utah11707.05.1985-6902.01.1985186
3North Dakota12107.06.1936-6002.15.1936181
4Alaska10006.27.1915-8001.23.1971180
5California13407.10.1913-4501.20.1937179
6Idaho11807.28.1934-6001.18.1943178
7South Dakota12004.06.2036-5802.17.1936178
8Wyoming11508.08.1983-6302.09.1933178
9Colorado11407.11.1954-6102.01.1985175
10Minnesota11507.29.1917-6002.02.1996175
11Nevada12506.29.1994-5001.08.1937175
12New Mexico12206.27.1994-5002.01.1951172
13Oregon11707.27.1939-5403.31.2036171
14Wisconsin11407.13.1936-5502.04.1996169
15Arizona12806.29.1994-4001.07.1971168
16Washington11804.15.2036-4812.30.1968166
17Iowa11807.20.1934-4702.28.2036165
18Nebraska11803.01.2036-4703.16.2036165
19Michigan11207.13.1936-5102.09.1934163
20Kansas12103.01.2036-4002.13.1905161
21New York10907.22.1926-5203.23.2036161
22Missouri11803.13.2036-4002.13.1905158
23Maine10503.05.2036-5001.16.2009155
24Vermont10507.04.1911-5012.30.1933155
25Illinois11707.14.1954-3601.05.1999153
26New Hampshire10607.04.1911-4703.19.2036153
27Pennsylvania11103.07.2036-4201.05.1904153
28Indiana11607.14.1936-3601.19.1994152
29Ohio11307.21.1934-3903.27.2036152
30Kentucky11407.28.1930-3701.19.1994151
31Oklahoma12003.29.2036-3102.10.2011151
32Arkansas12008.10.1936-2902.13.1905149
33Maryland10903.07.2036-4001.13.1912149
34West Virginia11203.07.2036-3712.30.1917149
35Massachusetts10708.02.1975-4001.22.1984147
36Tennessee11304.08.2036-3212.30.1917145
37New Jersey11007.10.1936-3401.05.1904144
38North Carolina11008.21.1983-3401.21.1985144
39Connecticut10607.15.1995-3702.16.1943143
40Texas12004.10.2036-2304.11.2036143
41Virginia11007.15.1954-3001.22.1985140
42Alabama11009.05.1925-2701.30.1966137
43South Carolina11304.04.2036-2201.21.1985135
44Mississippi11507.29.1930-1901.30.1966134
45Rhode Island10408.02.1975-2801.17.1942132
46Louisiana11408.10.1936-1602.20.2036130
47Georgia11202.22.2036-1701.27.1940129
48Delaware11007.21.1930-1704.20.2036127
49District of Columbia10607.20.1930-1504.21.2036121
50Florida10906.29.1931-204.22.2036111
51Hawaii9807.14.19571501.05.197583

2018 Trip Checklist Update

  • West Coast Trail
  • CT Segment 8
  • CT Segments 18-21 – Going to be dry
  • San Luis Peak
  • Castle and Conundrum
  • Padre – Failed, redo 3.19
  • Longs, Mt. Lady Washington, Storm
  • Mt. Taylor
  • Blanca and Ellingwood, Lindsey – Will likely punt due to fire
  • Culebra
  • Challenger, Kit Carson, Columbia Point, Obstruction, Humbolt
  • Mosquito Gulch (Loveland, Buckskin, Tweto, Treasurevault, Mosquito, Kuss, London) — Will likely punt due to fire
  • Alphabetizer Loop Lost Creek Wilderness (12.2 miles 4000 feet) X and Y prime, Y and Z and zyphyr – Probably winter/late shoulder season
  • Antero
  • Mt. Holy Cross
  • Sunshine, Handies, Redcloud, Sun Dog (Silver Creek camp)
  • East and West Spanish Peaks – Will likely punt due to fire
  • Roache’s Massive Mania
  • Santa Fe, Morgan, Sullivan, Geneva, Landslide
  • Square Top, Decatur Revenue, Silver (this might be combined with trip above if we camp)
  • Lower Gunnison Paddleboarding 3-day trip (https://rootsrated.com/stories/canoeing-colorado-s-lower-gunnison-river-the-perfect-beginner-trip-on)
  • Fremont10- Hayden Pass to North Decker Creek Traverse (https://www.summitpost.org/hayden-pass-to-north-decker-creek-traverse/723624) – Moving this to next year

So on to plan B?

2018 Trip Checklist

  • West Coast Trail
  • Padre
  • Longs. Mt. Lady Washington, Storm
  • Mt. Taylor
  • Blanca and Ellingwood, Lindsey
  • Challenger, Kit Carson, Humbolt
  • Culebra
  • Challenger, Kit Carson, Columbia Point, Obstruction, Humbolt
  • Mosquito Gulch (Loveland, Buckskin, Tweto, Treasurevault, Mosquito, Kuss, London)
  • Alphabetizer Loop Lost Creek Wilderness (12.2 miles 4000 feet) X and Y prime, Y and Z and zyphyr
  • Antero
  • Mt. Holy Cross
  • Sunshine, Handies, Redcloud, Sun Dog (Silver Creek camp)
  • East and West Spanish Peaks
  • Massive
  • Santa Fe, Morgan, Sullivan, Geneva, Landslide
  • Square Top, Decatur Revenue, Silver (this might be combined with trip above if we camp)
  • Lower Gunnison Paddleboarding 3-day trip (https://rootsrated.com/stories/canoeing-colorado-s-lower-gunnison-river-the-perfect-beginner-trip-on)
  • CT Segment 8
  • Fremont10- Hayden Pass to North Decker Creek Traverse (https://www.summitpost.org/hayden-pass-to-north-decker-creek-traverse/723624)

Mosquito Gulch Trip

I was playing around with Caltopo during lunch one day at work, and stumbled across the Mosquito Gulch cirque section shown below:

which, at  10.69 miles and 5000 vertical ascent, offers 7 13ers:

  • Loveland
  • Buckskin
  • Tweto
  • Treasurevault
  • Mosquito
  • Kuss
  • London

There are a half dozen or more trip reports out there (like this one https://www.14ers.com/php14ers/tripreport.php?trip=8533). Definitely going to have to throw this into the summer mix.

Quandary Peak Winter Climb Lessons

A buddy and I decided to go after Quandary Peak shortly before the years end after a third party backed out (rightfully) of our initial Mt. Lady Washington plans. The weather forecast called for clear, unseasonably warm (at that altitude) temperature with a moderate 35 MPH breeze at the summit. With 100 MPH winds all across the area, they were a little off on their wind estimates.

  • https://www.facebook.com/feldman81/videos/10215022322049403/
  • http://kdvr.com/2017/12/30/wind-gusts-to-nearly-100-mph-force-breckenridge-resort-to-close/

Below is a video I took in a somewhat sheltered area right above treeline after we decided to retreat at about 13,100 Ft

The lessons learned:

  1. Snow is hard, even easier 14ers are hard, so still need to start early and hydrate, get calories. The wind played a huge factor in our ascent speed, but we were ascending at 1/3 -1/4 my summer ascent speed
  2. Wind is hard, and head-wind is even harder (especially above 60 MPH) … see above
  3. Snowshoes are easier than post-holing, even if you only post-hole every 50th step or so
  4. Attach gloves and other stuff that can fly away to something
  5. Don’t leave god-damned insoles at the house (had to use an extra pair of socks that Matt brought, which severally effed my toe coming down)
  6. Spike covers are good, and in the case of quandary, snow axe not even remotely necessary, not many opportunities for glissade (could change in Spring)
  7. Figure out the damn balaclava situation, couldn’t breath with it on, glasses fogged, nose and lips shitty with it off (see 7 follow up below)
  8. Figure out where to pack everything … I am very experienced with summer backpacking/hiking, but I spent about 20 minutes shuffling shit around this trip (see 8 follow up below)
  9. I left my dam anemometer at home. I knew I wanted to bring it, and now I am pissed that I do not have an actual reading of the wind speeds we dealt with, just a rough estimate of 70-85 MPH on a couple of the stronger gusts
  10. Start early, even when you do not think you need to start early. Others summited simply because the started earlier and the wind really picked up beginning around 1 PM.
  11. Caltopo is awesome … no seriously these guys rule. Their free service provides grade slope angle shading on maps, and just about every other feature/layer you could want (www.caltopo.com)

7 – Follow up.

I was fighting my balaclava/google/hat situation the entire length of the hike. All was well when it was cold and we were stationary, but it was difficult to breath during some of the more strenous portions since the balaclava didn’t have any vents. My shitty moto googles fogged up regularly, and my nose was cold an miserable without a balaclava. I shopped around a little and decided to give these two items a go:

  • https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0175TMTOS/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o09_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
  • https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0018BJSQC/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o06_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I wore everything around the house marching up and down the stairs and this …

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

is decidedly better than …

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

even though I look like a B movie villian

8 – Follow up.

I spent an hour playing around with my pack earlier this week and I was able to find a good (enough) setup for everything. My snowshoes are clipped to the side of the bag, avalanche prob is right inside the main compartment, ice axe is affixed to one of the loops on the front of the bag, and the snow shovel is clipped to the front of the bag, and its handle in the front slot.  It is still a PITA to get some of the deeper items out of the main compartment. Eventually I will find a better winter bag.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here comes the heat

Quoting a report from motherboard …

Think of the stickiest, record-hot summer you’ve ever experienced, whether you’re 30 or 60 years old. In 10 years or less, that miserable summer will happen every second year across most of the U.S. and Canada, the Mediterranean, and much of Asia, according to a study to be published in the open access journal Earth’s Future. By the 2030s, every second summer over almost all of the entire Northern hemisphere will be hotter than any record-setting hot summer of the past 40 years, the study found. By 2050, virtually every summer will be hotter than anything we’ve experienced to date. Record hot summers are now 70 times more likely than they were in the past 40 years over the entire Northern hemisphere, the peer-reviewed study found. What does all this mean? Heat alerts will be increasing, cities will have to employ aggressive cooling strategies most summers, and in places like South Asia, it will be too dangerous to work outside, Francis Zwiers, director of the Pacific Climate Impacts Consortium at Canada’s University of Victoria, said.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017EF000639/abstract




© Ahuiz.com 2006-2016